How is this different to collective consumption by a local government body today?

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The lowest level government body today, such as a borough or district, is a representative body covering a large number of people. Representatives are elected every four years or so.

Instead, a neighbourhood consumers’ council is a direct decision-making body made up of a smaller size of people (e.g. 100 people, the exact number will vary and be worked out through experience) that live together in a community where every member has a vote on decisions. It is not a representative body.

Neighbourhood consumer councils participate in an annual democratic planning procedure to participate in the economy, whereas local government bodies today do not.

Higher level consumer councils in the federation are made up of delegates which are recallable and rotatable and may be requested to formulate referendums by sending councils on contentious issues. Whereas, government bodies today have representatives typically from political parties which are hard to recall and are not rotated. There is typically no direct decision-making in practice.

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